color me critical

Crayola Color Corner

I like that the black crayon on Crayola’s website stands for Helpful Information.

Here are a few things about the Crayola history I don’t like quite as much:

Prussian Blue … Name changed to “midnight blue” in 1958 in response to teachers’ requests.

What the …?!

Lesson PlansFlesh … Name voluntarily changed to “peach” in 1962, partially as a result of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement.

Does this imply that the other name changes were involuntary?

Arts and crafts projectsIndian Red is renamed Chestnut in 1999 in response to educators who felt some children wrongly perceived the crayon color was intended to represent the skin color of Native Americans. The name originated from a reddish-brown pigment found near India commonly used in fine artist oil paint.

This one reminds me of the North Carolina teacher who was reprimanded a few years ago for using the word ‘niggardly’ in class.

Fun pages to print and colorFluorescent colors added in 1972, including Chartreuse.
Fluorescent color names change in 1990. Chartreuse becomes Screamin’ Green.

And kids just get dumber and dumber.

(Thanks to Brumaire for pointing out this page.)

Advertisements

One Response to color me critical

  1. freeman says:

    I guess teachers didn’t like being reminded of the Prussian origins of the institutions that they worked for.I recently introduced the works of John Taylor Gatto to someone whose wife is a teacher. Despite the well-documented history of government schools and how they were modeled after 19th century Prussian schools, I was laughed at for believing such “tin foil hat stuff”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: